Health Systems and Tobacco Use

How to Talk to Patients About Quitting Smoking

When health care providers provide brief, simple advice about quitting smoking they increase the likelihood that patients will quit and remain quit a year later.1

The following short, training videos are provided by the Cease Smoking Today (CS2day) partners, and were developed as part of an initiative supported by unrestricted educational grants from Pfizer, Inc. CS2day integrates current science with a thorough assessment of physician/healthcare professional needs into innovative and traditional educational formats. 

Pregnant Patient

Hospitalized Patient with Myocardial Infarction

Patient with Myocardial Infarction–Follow-Up Intervention

Patient Attending Group Program–Pharmacy-Based Intervention

Patient Ready to Quit-Dr. Office Visit

Patient Ready to Quit–Pharmacy-Based Combination Intervention

Patient Recently Quit–Follow-Up Counseling Intervention

Smoking Patient with Asthmatic Child

Patient with Asthma–Pharmacy-Based Intervention for a Social Smoker

Patient with Cardiovascular Disease–Pharmacy-Based Intervention

Patient with Emphysema–Pharmacy-Based Intervention

Patient with Emphysema–Pharmacy-Based Intervention–Follow-Up Counseling

Patient with Pulmonary Disease–Emergency Room Intervention

Patient Being Discharged from Hospital-Relapse Prevention

Patient on Oral Contraceptives-Pharmacy-Based Intervention

Patient with Injured Ankle-Brief Counseling Intervention

Patient with Diabetes-Not Ready to Quit

Patient with Depression-Ready to Quit

Patient with Schizophrenia-Not Ready to Quit

Patient in Recovery from Alcholism-Not Ready to Quit


[1] Stead, L.F., G. Bergson, and T. Lancaster. 2008. Physician advice for smoking cessation. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD000165. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD000165.pub3.

SHARE THIS CONTENT:
   
Refer patients to California's Smokers Helpline
Free Continuing Education Course--Smoking and Asthma